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Bring down spikes exercising after meals.

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  • Bring down spikes exercising after meals.

    Since I started my fight against IR I realized that most of the glucose spike could be flattened down after 25min FAST walk on an elliptical machine including 8 bursts of 15s at maximum force, totalling 320 kcal. Is this approach correct? Fight quick sugar with quick demand!

  • #2
    Your brain and muscles get 1st crack at blood sugar, so increasing muscle demand for glucose can help. I wonder if there are any brain exercises that would also bring down blood glucose!

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    • #3
      I've not seen brain exercises bring down blood sugar. But I have seen exactly the same thing as Oketz. In fact, it's one of the reasons I recommend people try the Libre. Watching the Libre value makes it very clear that taking a brisk walk actually tends to cut the top off of post-meal spikes.

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      • sthubbar
        sthubbar commented
        Editing a comment
        Ford Brewer; this could be a great way to 'cheat' an OGTT. Between drinking the glucose and each test, take a brisk walk. Is it really 'cheating' if we make a habit of taking a brisk walk after every meal or a realistic reflection of everyday glucose values?

    • #4
      A few nights ago, post dinner 1 hour BG was 140.
      Did 7 sets of 7/8 pull ups + a few sets of dips + jogging on the spot.
      Checked BG again at 90 minute mark after dinner - BG was 149.4.
      I reckon it may have been the cortisol (?) since I usually spike after 1 hour.
      Bottom line - extensive exercise may temporarily raise BG via raised cortisol (Dr Ford said something similar when he was using a CGM and he was excercising at a gym)
      Perhaps will try more of a gentler forms of exercise after meal next time!


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      • Tom
        Tom commented
        Editing a comment
        sthubbar, While moving around and walking are good for the body, doing more intense exercise but not too much results in beneficial hormesis. During hormesis the body will ramp up repair mechanisms which promote healing and better health overall. Fasting inducing autophagy is another example of hormesis. The main thing is to do enough to promote healthy hormesis but not too much as that will be overall harmful.

      • Tom
        Tom commented
        Editing a comment
        sthubbar, I heard a Peter Attia podcast recently that went into some detail on metabolic flexibility and how that relates to insulin resistance. I will make a new post soon on this topic, and I thought that one of the comments was interesting. Dr. Inigo San Milian, the podcast guest, suggested that several long (60-90 minute) zone 2 exercise sessions per week are the best for increasing mitochondria efficiency (his version has six zones vs. the standard five). For many people with insulin resistance that would be a brisk walk.

      • sthubbar
        sthubbar commented
        Editing a comment
        Tom, I saw your post about Peter Attia's comment about Zone 2 excercise. Thank you.

    • #5
      Is there any validity to wild bitter melon and Rock Lotus in reducing glucose levels?

      Read this section -
      Healthy Holiday Eating Tip #3: Use The Right Supplements
      https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/art...g-supplements/

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