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Sedentary skinny is healthier than active skinny

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  • Sedentary skinny is healthier than active skinny

    I guess there are no examples of a sedentary skinny (non-smoker) person that has suffered from cardiovascular disease (CVD). On the other hand, there are many stories of active skinny (non-smoker) people having heart attacks.

    The reason why is that in order to be skinny and sedentary a person must consume low calories and keep a low blood sugar, otherwise they would fatten. Exercise is equivalent to cocaine and smoking when it comes to weight and CVD prevention in the fact that all three of them can keep a person skinny while masking an internal buildup of plaque.

    Can anyone provide an example of a sedentary skinny (non-smoker) suffering a heart attack?

    Upon doing a little research it seems that sarcopenia or sarcopenic obesity would be likely examples of a sedentary skinny non-smoker at risk for CVD. I guess a CIMT would uncover this CVD risk, so the standard recommendation of getting a CIMT remains.
    Last edited by sthubbar; 08-01-2019, 12:56 AM.

  • #2
    What evidence do you have that sedentary, skinny, non-smokers don’t have CVEs? I’m with you on the need for cIMTs.

    Comment


    • sthubbar
      sthubbar commented
      Editing a comment
      Joe, no evidence, hence the "I guess". I was thinking about this because I have heard people trying to discredit the plant-based diet by pointing out those on the diet who have suffered from CVD.

    • Tom
      Tom commented
      Editing a comment
      A while back I learned from a Banting lecture that subcutaneous fat is important for metabolic health, and some groups of people have less than others. It turns out that south Asians (and maybe east Asians) are prone to insulin resistance even though they can be skinny looking. Here is an older Peter Attia podcast with Ronesh Sinha where this is discussed in some detail.
      https://peterattiamd.com/roneshsinha/

  • #3
    The sequence of you posts make it seem to me that you need to examine the logic shift in your posts. At first there was a contrast of sedentary be active skinny people. Then it shifts to plant based. I would encourage you to learn, question and challenge, but not jump between logic premises.

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    • sthubbar
      sthubbar commented
      Editing a comment
      Kayak Greg; you are right this post is all over the place. I would like to change the title "is" to "could be". I think what I was thinking was the example of extreme athletes who die from an apparent sudden cardiac event when they are below 50 and skinny. So the exercise was masking the underlying plaque buildup. So if someone is sedentary and skinny are they less likely to build up plaque?

  • #4
    I have sort of wondered at times why exercise, which raises the heart rate, is good for the heart and drugs which do the same don't give similar benefits.

    Imagine coking your way to good health

    Comment


    • Tom
      Tom commented
      Editing a comment
      I am not sure that all of the metabolic pathways turned on by exercise are known, but the body's autonomic nervous system seems to respond to exercise by keeping both blood pressure and resting heart rate lower for a longer time after the relatively brief exercise period when those increase. This is probably a positive adaptive response to exercise. In the hunter-gatherer groups, people would hunt in packs and require the ability to run long distances at times to catch prey which could outrun a human hunting group in the short-term but not over a longer period of time. Most drugs are hammers without a lot of finesse or body-wide pleiotropric effects.

    • sthubbar
      sthubbar commented
      Editing a comment
      Good point. It's probably the other benefits like lymphatic stimulation, muscle/tendon growth or stress as well as increased respiration.

      You are welcome to "coke your way to good health" and report back here and let us know how it works.

  • #5
    sthubbar did enough coke in my early 20s, 41 now. HIIT is about the closest I get these days. Maybe if I have a really bad cold or flu, which is rare, the phenylephrine might get me a bit hopped up.

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    • #6
      Not exactly on the OP's line if thinking but TOFIs exist.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/29073292/

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