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Dr. K Lance Gould - Non-Invasive Reversal of Heart Disease

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  • Dr. K Lance Gould - Non-Invasive Reversal of Heart Disease

    Hi Dr. Brewer,

    Thought the second half of this video may be of interest...Dr. Gould advocates:

    1. Getting lean via high fiber/moderate protein.
    2. Exercise.
    3. Mild statin as needed.

    Wonder what your thoughts are on his findings and recommendations?

  • #2
    I thought that it was an interesting video. Dr. Brewer has made some videos including many of the same points in the first part of the video about the lack of positive outcomes from the large amount of stents being put in for partial blockages of arteries for preventative care. I thought that the focus of Dr. Gould's video was not on reversal of heart disease but proper identification of patients who do or do not need further medical intervention (with good diet/lifestyle being critical for future health). In that sense Dr. Gould makes a compelling case for using a PET scan for blood flow evaluation rather than hurrying off to the cath lab for a stent. He did make the point that sometimes improved diet/lifestyle on its own is enough, but well-focused medical intervention is required in other cases. The one drawback that I see is the cost of getting this type of PET scan is likely going to be expensive for those who don't have a serious enough issue to get their insurance to cover the procedure. A person is typically already a long way down the cardiovascular disease pathway by the time they have some issue that results in the referral to a cardiologist and then potentially such a PET scan. A CAC score and/or CIMT test, are relatively inexpensive and good first line tools for evaluating risk early on. As mentioned many medical issues can be prevented by healthy living and medications (as necessary).

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Tom View Post
      I thought that it was an interesting video. Dr. Brewer has made some videos including many of the same points in the first part of the video about the lack of positive outcomes from the large amount of stents being put in for partial blockages of arteries for preventative care. I thought that the focus of Dr. Gould's video was not on reversal of heart disease but proper identification of patients who do or do not need further medical intervention (with good diet/lifestyle being critical for future health). In that sense Dr. Gould makes a compelling case for using a PET scan for blood flow evaluation rather than hurrying off to the cath lab for a stent. He did make the point that sometimes improved diet/lifestyle on its own is enough, but well-focused medical intervention is required in other cases. The one drawback that I see is the cost of getting this type of PET scan is likely going to be expensive for those who don't have a serious enough issue to get their insurance to cover the procedure. A person is typically already a long way down the cardiovascular disease pathway by the time they have some issue that results in the referral to a cardiologist and then potentially such a PET scan. A CAC score and/or CIMT test, are relatively inexpensive and good first line tools for evaluating risk early on. As mentioned many medical issues can be prevented by healthy living and medications (as necessary).
      Gould does discuss the reversal of heart disease -- for example, around 34:00 into the video, he shows examples of two patients where one's disease worsens (didn't follow Gould's recommendations) where the other did follow his program and the PET scan verified improvements. But agree on the PET scan costs, but, from a physics perspective he makes an interesting point regarding blood flow that I haven't seen discussed elsewhere by other doctors.

      What I found interesting is what Dr. Gould recommends: a low fat approach (10%) but appears to allow for more carbs than what Dr. Brewer suggests. (May be incorrect in this statement.) In one of his videos, Dr. Gould discusses food choices such as small amounts of Kashi cereal (believe it was a 1/2 cup) with no-fat yogurt and blueberries for breakfast. https://www.uth.tmc.edu/pet/patients...se-pyramid.htm
      Last edited by ChrisDQ; 12-13-2019, 08:13 AM. Reason: Cut off the parts, retain one link to approve the post.

      Comment


    • #4
      Thanks, Parker. It's an interesting item. There's no question that decreasing fat mass helps. See my video on the Secret Life of Fat Cells. Please note that one of the best ways to lower daily blood glucose value patterns is to decrease fat mass. So, again, we're getting into 2 very highly correlated items: blood glucose control and fat mass.Does that mean totally ignore daily blood glucose values? I don't think so. See my videos on Chuck Smith - WILD RIDE. He lost 50 pounds on a vegan diet. Soon after that, he had a heart attack. Upon learning about TG/HDL and blood glucose values, he found his TG/HDL was 5. He then cut his carbs and got down to a TG/HDL of less than 1. I'm not sure how to clarify further, or whether this speaks to your question.

      Comment


      • Leslie Feinberg
        Leslie Feinberg commented
        Editing a comment
        Dr. Brewer, I have a couple of questions after watching many of your videos on YouTube. In one video you mention the idea that CAC demonstrated plaque volume and extent of areas calcified describes a more significant risk than plaque calcium density. Makes sense that an unstable plaque is less dangerous once reinforced with calcium. My question is that you seem to be equating the condition of unstabilized plaques with a different situation, the decalcified condition of a previously stabilized and calcified plaque that has been the subject of successful interventions to reverse plaque and calcification. My first thought is that the conditions within the media and intima once calcification has become dense must also be different in the condition of the vessel tissues in other ways such as the degree of active inflammation. So, is it reasonable to equate the risk to decalcify and remove plaque in those two different situations? I also was trying to understand how your views as expressed in the video I'm referring to square with another video in which you describe a 60% decrease in your own CAC score.

        I appreciate any clarification you can offer.

        I'm also curious of your view of Cardioretinometry as a proxy for CAC, offering a way to follow changing coronary artery conditions with more frequent observations.

        Finally, very high dose vitamin C with proline and lysine to help release Lp(a) from the artery is recommended in the Pauling-Rath protocol. I'm curious what you think of supplementing with ascorbic acid in the 20-30 grams/day range as part of a program using Vitamin K, D3, B3, magnesium, and intermittent fasting.

        Thanks,

        Leslie S. Feinberg, D.C.

      • Tom
        Tom commented
        Editing a comment
        I have a couple of thoughts on Leslie Feinberg's comment. There is a lot of conjecture on the Internet on reducing calcium in plaque, and thus seemingly to reverse heart disease. What I haven't seen is hard data from a large enough group to provide any resolution. The one thing that we do know is that stable calcified plaque likely won't cause the same problems associated with soft inflamed plaque. As to what happens to partially or fully calcified plaque if all of the calcium is removed (or even possible), who knows for sure? Is the cardiovascular inflammation of the patient high or low at that point? There are just a lot of variables to ponder...As far as decreasing a CAC score by 60%, I believe that was John Lorscheider. I have to wonder if the CT machine for each of John's CAC score measurements was of the same generation with the same software package. As per that same video, John discussed his "increased" CIMT test plaque burden that was more of a reflection on the improved software package (and perhaps operator technique) than the reality of what was changing in his carotid arteries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysifMKWKZLY&t=98s Sometimes we see numbers and inherently trust those numbers more than we should.

        As to the second part of your comment, well the Internet is full of "one person cure stories" for heart disease and cancer. I am always open to new theories but skeptical until I see some hard data. Is there substantial hard data on the Pauling-Roth protocol? I couldn't find a randomized blind study for that protocol, and the limited number of websites I noted seemed to just point back to each other for "proof". Perhaps you can provide a randomized blind study. It would be interesting if even ten people would get a CAC scan, go through this protocol for a period of time, and then get another CAC scan to show that the calcium in their arteries disappeared. Throwing in another supposed valid test (Cardioretinometry) to test a new theory is problematic to say the least if the idea is to really understand the effect of the treatment/lifestyle change. I am reminded of another scenario recently where a new subscriber posted that his cardiovascular disease was essentially cured over a short period by changing to a plant based diet. I have nothing against that diet, but he used different technologies to show his initial and post-treatment results and thus the real potential for misunderstanding what changes actually occurred.
        Last edited by Tom; 12-17-2019, 06:56 AM.

    • #5
      By the way, Parker, I had our guys investigate your admin questions in October, and again this week. They really didn't find clarity. But you should hear from them re: what they did find. Let me know if you don't.

      Comment


      • #6
        I’m aware of growing interest in retinal imaging for cardiac risk I look forward to a reliable test in the area. I don’t think the evidence supports it yet. I’m confused about your question re: John’s decrease in calcium score. I don’t think the body (or K2 or anything else removes calcium & leaves plaque unstable). I believe loss of calcium is an outcome, not a cause.

        Comment


        • #7
          Dr. Gould practices in Houston. I have an aunt (by marriage) that was treated using his protocol and saw significant reversal. My mom was also treated by one of his associates but never followed his dietary guidelines. It's not nearly as restrictive as Esselstyn or Ornish, but still gets results. Here's the quick and dirty version:

          1) reduce fat intake to less than 10% of calories (15-20gms/day)
          2) keep dietary cholesterol between 80-100mg/day
          3) intake at least 60-80gm protein/day from non-fat dairy products, vegeburgers, yolk-free egg products, protein supplements, fish, some beans, and some meats such as chicken, turkey breast, and extra-lean pork.
          4) Make proteins, vegetables and salads the main component of food, steamed or grilled, not fried or seasoned with excess oil.
          5) Eliminate bulk carbs such as rice, bread, potatoes, pasta, pastries, sweets, etc.

          Here's a link to the full guide. https://www.uth.tmc.edu/pet/Assets/p...guidelines.pdf

          Here's a link to the homepage of their Weatherhead PET Imaging Center. It includes some useful links as well. https://www.uth.tmc.edu/pet/
          Last edited by James; 01-08-2020, 10:54 AM.

          Comment


          • #8
            Dr. Gould practices in Houston. I have an aunt (by marriage) that was treated using his protocol and saw significant reversal. My mom was also treated by one of his associates but never followed his dietary guidelines. It's not nearly as restrictive as Esselstyn or Ornish, but still gets results. Here's the quick and dirty version:

            1) reduce fat intake to less than 10% of calories (15-20gms/day)
            2) keep dietary cholesterol between 80-100mg/day
            3) intake at least 60-80gm protein/day from non-fat dairy products, vegeburgers, yolk-free egg products, protein supplements, fish, some beans, and some meats such as chicken, turkey breast, and extra-lean pork.
            4) Make proteins, vegetables and salads the main component of food, steamed or grilled, not fried or seasoned with excess oil.
            5) Eliminate bulk carbs such as rice, bread, potatoes, pasta, pastries, sweets, etc.

            Here's a link to the full guide. https://www.uth.tmc.edu/pet/Assets/p...guidelines.pdf

            Comment

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