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Fatty Liver = saturated fats

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  • Fatty Liver = saturated fats

    According to this study - i am eating the wrong things. I don’t eat meat but I do use olive, avocado and macadamia nut oils and now I’m confused again!!!
    https://youtu.be/JM7SAA_Vj60. Yet another twist.

  • #2
    Yep, more confusion. I did just the opposite of what Dr. Kahn is preaching in his videos and my coronary calcium score regressed by 59% in 16 months along with dropping my BMI and lowering inflammation. A video on that will be published this Saturday on Dr. Brewer’s YouTube channel. He is a professed vegan, so he is biased, even though he says he isn’t. I eat a LOT of fat like avocados, nuts, EVOO, along with eggs, cheese, butter, meat,nets. Fats are not the enemy, carbs are. I followed the Ornish plan which is similar to Kahn’s and I gained a lot of weight from the high-carb/low-fat dogma.

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    • #3
      Yes I switched too John...and I sense his bias...but when he shows the studies that seem legit...and the results of those studies support what he says in his videos. I'm wondering if the studies themselves are biased?

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      • mtbizzle
        mtbizzle commented
        Editing a comment
        Hey Robin, you mentioned eating olive oil, avocado, and macadamia. And also mentioned eating the wrong things, in this context suggesting high saturated fat content. I think each of the macadamia, avocado, and olive have similar fat profiles -- about 75% monounsaturated fat, and about 15% saturated fat. I wouldn't call any of those high in saturated fat! And the mono's are great.

    • #4
      Here is the full study Dr. Kahn briefly waived in front of his camera. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/41/8/1732. The subjects were overfed by 1,000 calories per day for 3 weeks. The macronutrient profile and saturated fat intake changed for each of the 3 groups. The groups became more sedentary as they at more calories and their livers became fatty, gained more weight and became more insulin resistant. The authors point to high intake of saturated fats (palmitic acid) as being the cause for all of this. That is not the same as saying saturated fats from animal sources are the smoking gun. It is naturally present I butter, cheese, milk, and meat, as well as cocoa butter, soybean oil and sunflower oil. My question for Dr. Kahn would be where is the science that shows people on low-carb and ketogenic diets have higher fatty liver disease. There is no data that supports his argument that I can find. Do you have any? High blood triglyceride levels associated with high carbohydrate and fructose consumption have always been known causes for NAFLD.

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      • #5
        Good points John, as usual, there are these legit doctors out there that really don’t help educate us. Dr. Brewer is the only one I trust because he at least says he has no answers if he doesn’t have them!!

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        • #6
          Thanks, Robin. Joel K is a friend and associate. But we do disagree on this issue. Joel, like several others, has fixated on animal products. I wish it were that simple. I did that personally for a long time. It didn't help. And yes, John, that's a pretty good analysis. If we simply add 1,000 fat calories/day to your typical overweight person's diet, you will clearly make things worse - including heart disease. I think that is a key part of the misunderstanding in the science area. You see cardiologists (like Joel Kahn & Neal Bernard) still preaching the plant-based gospel. And Greger, the animal rights doc. And Esselstyn & a few others. But how many endocrinologists are still stuck there? None. Because recent science is showing that it's an endocrine issue. It's not a "bank account/calorie counting" or animal rights issue.

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          • #7
            Thanks for the reassurance.

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            • #8
              You're very welcome, Robin. I hope you're having good holidays. And no matter what sort of challenges you might have, it's difficult keeping glucose in line during the holidays. I hope your Libre findings are enlightening - and maybe even re-assuring in some way.

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              • #9
                This is my first post here. I mistakenly sent a message to Dr. Brewer regarding this paper: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3572653/ which is way too technical for me. Could anyone shed some light on it? The claim seems quite bold: it states that saturated fat DOES cause insulin resistance. Is it correct? Thanks.

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by oketz View Post
                  This is my first post here. I mistakenly sent a message to Dr. Brewer regarding this paper: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3572653/ which is way too technical for me. Could anyone shed some light on it? The claim seems quite bold: it states that saturated fat DOES cause insulin resistance. Is it correct? Thanks.
                  I didn't see any evidence that they proved that it causes insulin resistance. On the contrary, they state ....Although several mechanisms have been implicated in the development of insulin resistance [16], more studies are necessary to elucidate the link between the mechanisms of insulin resistance and fatty acid intake.

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                  • #11
                    It's an interesting article. And my quick skim through it indicates a similar reaction to what I saw from David above. I did put it down for a further video review. But that's going to be weeks, maybe months, off. Dietary fat epidemiology lives on a long history of logic. But the world, as we know, is often not logical. Therefore, fat in the diet may not end up equaling fat in the artery walls. There is a recurring an prevalent confounding component: total calories & subject weight. Both of these are obviously related to atherosclerosis as well as their tendency to be related to the item in question - fatty content of the diet.

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                    • #12
                      Dr. Brewer,
                      On one of your videos I thought I recalled the fact that said you eat fatty fish (salmon) every day.
                      Is that correct? Do you eat any other meats, eggs, cheeses?

                      Thank You.

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