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Lead Exposure and Heart Disease

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  • Lead Exposure and Heart Disease

    I recently had a toxic metals provoked urine test. You do a urine sample to get a baseline, then take DMSA, followed by collecting urine for the next 6 hours and then taking a sample of the collected urine. I was expecting mercury to be high because I have a lot of amalgam fillings.

    What is surprising is that mercury is high, 5.7 which should be under 3, so not as bad as I expected, but lead was extremely high. I have no idea where the lead came from. Lead is supposed to be <2 and mine is 14.

    I thought I would do a search for lead and heart disease, and of course, there is a relationship. So one more thing for us to worry about.

    Last year, a study in Lancet Public Health found a link between lead exposure and a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease. The data came from more than 14,000 people in the United States who were adults in the late 1980s. The association persisted after researchers controlled for many confounding factors, and was evident even among people with blood lead levels of less than 5 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL). Until 2013, only levels higher than 10 µg/dL were considered worrisome, and mainly for children.
    https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/...-2019040516296

  • #2
    I'm exposed to lead at work, so I occasionally test for heavy metals myself. Possible sources of lead contamination include your water supply, paint (if you live in an old house), and work (if you handle plumbing or electronics). I've actually never tested high for any metal other than arsenic, and that was organic arsenic, likely due to heavy fish consumption. Supposedly organic arsenic is benign, but you have to wonder...

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    • #3
      So Rich, are you going to do IV chelation to get the lead out that's weighing on your mind (and heart)? Some chelation practitioners say that oral chelation with liposomal EDTA is as effective as IV, less expensive and doesn't take 3 hours per infusion. (Quite apart from the $2-3,000 cost of a course of IV, having to spend 1-2 mornings a week for multiple weeks hooked up to the IV tends to be incompatible with holding down a job.) IIRC Thomtas Levy says in a video that he no longer uses IV as he found the liposomal EDTA just as effective.

      The word on plain EDTA seems to be mixed. Some say it's ineffective - principally the practitioners of IV chelation so there may be a financial motive there. Others say that you can achieve 90%+ absorption through the membranes of the mouth by taking it sublingually or the colon via suppositories. Supposedly there was a soap manufacturer in Milwaukee who would buy EDTA by the barrel and hand it out free to heart disease patients. Anecdotally it worked.

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      • rich
        rich commented
        Editing a comment
        I also have high mercury, but at this time have no plan to replace amalgams. I think that to do chelation, either IV or oral, I would need to have the amalgams replaced first. That would add another $3k-$4k, making the total cost at least $6k.

        Right now I am leaning toward buying a far infrared sauna. At least that way I will have something worth $3k. Going to talk to my doc and look for alternatives to strong chelation agents.

        ETA: Just talked to my doc and she agreed sauna was a good plan. She says that in VA, she see's a lot of patients with high lead and she thinks it is in the air.

        Regarding removing amalgams before chelation, she said there is a difference of opinion whether chelation pulls mercury out of fillings or not.

        Either way, sauna should help reduce both mercury and lead stored in fat.
        Last edited by rich; 08-05-2019, 10:10 AM.

    • #4
      Originally posted by rich View Post
      I recently had a toxic metals provoked urine test. You do a urine sample to get a baseline, then take DMSA, followed by collecting urine for the next 6 hours and then taking a sample of the collected urine. I was expecting mercury to be high because I have a lot of amalgam fillings.

      What is surprising is that mercury is high, 5.7 which should be under 3, so not as bad as I expected, but lead was extremely high. I have no idea where the lead came from. Lead is supposed to be <2 and mine is 14.

      I thought I would do a search for lead and heart disease, and of course, there is a relationship. So one more thing for us to worry about.

      https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/...-2019040516296
      Did you do the DMSA treatment under the supervision of a functional med doctor?

      Comment


      • rich
        rich commented
        Editing a comment
        I only took DMSA to release heavy metals for urine test as prescribed by my integrated doctor. I am going to detox using a sauna, not DMSA.
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