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Leaky Gut = Leaky Arteries?

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  • Leaky Gut = Leaky Arteries?

    I've been doing a lot of reading on leaky gut. In leaky gut, things like diet, alcohol, gluten, stress, NSAIDS, etc causes holes between the gut wall cells. In other words, it causes the tight junctions between cells to become not tight.

    Isn't this the same thing that happens in atherosclerosis? That "holes" are created between the cells in the arterial wall and LDL is able to get through. Then wouldn't it make sense to focus on fixing the leaky artery wall and tighten up the tight junctions?

    Several studies have shown a correlation between gut problems and atherosclerosis. The question seems to be is does leaky gut cause atherosclerosis or do they both have a similar cause. Either way, it seems to me that fixing leaky gut may also fix leaky arteries.

    This might explain why a keto diet with animal protein and fat, a vegetarian diet, and the Mediterranean diet all seem to work for many people in reducing risk of heart disease. Could it be that they all tighten tight junctions? Dr Esselstyn focuses on fixing the arterial wall and Dr Gundry on fixing the gut wall. Interesting.

  • #2
    Here's a couple of articles:

    Is Leaky Gut a Cardiovascular Risk

    Investigating Intestinal Permeability and Gut Microbiota Roles in Acute Coronary Syndrome patients

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    • #3
      This video explains why inflammation is so critical in atherosclerosis. Right at the beginning he talks about gram negative bacteria - lipopolysaccharides or LPS's. LPS's get into the blood stream either through leaky gut or by attaching to saturated fat.

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      • #4
        Yeah, people with leaky gut are more prone to cardiovascular disease. However, I am not sure that the reverse is necessarily true because there are multiple potential causes for cardiovascular disease progression (or more likely several factors adding up over time as part of the aging process). In a few years we will likely be hearing about the epigenetic changes that occur for cardiovascular disease progression.
        Last edited by Tom; 11-17-2019, 02:24 AM.

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        • #5
          You are probably on to something Rich. I agree. BTW, is there a diagnostic test for leaky gut?

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          • #6
            https://youtu.be/tCDRXh0aomo
            Zonulin, the precursor of haptoglobin 2, opens the tight junctions.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by David View Post
              You are probably on to something Rich. I agree. BTW, is there a diagnostic test for leaky gut?
              As Dr Brewer said, Zonulin. Gluten seems to be one of the biggest contributors to leaky gut. My zonulin was high, cut out grains and started taking aloe vera and deglycerized licorice (DGL), and zonulin dropped down to a good level.

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              • #8
                I stumbled on this study about endoxicity and berberine when I was looking for something else. The study was done in mice and rabbits. Berberine is already being used to lower glucose levels and blood pressure, so it is something to be considered.

                In the study conclusion quote it mentions LPS. LPS is lipopolysaccaride and is the outer shell of gram negative bacteria. It gets into the blood stream both through leaky gut and by hitching a ride on fat. It's also called endotoxin and does nasty things to you. The 1st quote is about endotoxin related diseases and the 2nd is the study showing berberine blocks LPS. I believe it was the source of my cardiac disease.

                6 types of diseases in humans related to endotoxins of Gram-negative bacteria
                1. Complications from burns
                2. Coronary artery disease
                3. Neonatal Necrotising Enterocolitis
                4. Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis
                5. Cystic Fibrosis
                6. Autoimmune Diseases
                Conclusion: Berberine can act as a LPS antagonist and block the LPS/TLR4 signaling from the sourse, resulting in the anti-bacterial action.
                Last edited by rich; 01-29-2020, 07:54 AM.

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                • Tom
                  Tom commented
                  Editing a comment
                  When I read the part on coronary artery disease, I said I am not so sure about this article.
                  2. Coronary artery disease

                  Conditions in the coronary arteries are associated to the lipopolysaccharides mainly from the bacteria called Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Exposure to lipopolysaccharides induces the production of inflammatory mediators involved in atherogenesis, which, according to some authors, is also associated with atherosclerosis.

              • #9
                I picked that article just because it was the easiest way for me to get a list of diseases related to endotoxins. If you search on endotoxins and heart disease, you will find many articles, including scientific studies, showing the relationship between them.

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                • Tom
                  Tom commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I would pick articles that have credible evidence behind them instead of ones that just list a set of diseases that the writer of the article thought might be related to endotoxins. Yes, endotoxins do contribute to heart disease through leaky gut and interaction with LDL particles from what I have seen. However, what the writer listed for heart disease in item 2 isn't what I have seen.
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