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Cleveland Heart Inflammation Panel

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  • Cleveland Heart Inflammation Panel

    Just got my results and not what I expected. I have severe aortic stenosis and arterial blockage, so I expected I had a severe inflammation problem.

    I don't.

    Everything on all 3 pages is green and most are labeled low. Microalbumin is undetectable. Is this good?

    Even the 3rd page says:

    Risk for Disease: Low Risk
    Presence of Disease: Low Risk
    Disease Activity: Low Risk

    This is all good to know, but what do I do now to address plaque problem?

  • #2
    So, the real question may be have you found out and corrected, to the extent possible, whatever health issues resulted in the aortic stenosis and arterial blockage? If you did then great, just keep a healthy lifestyle going forward. If you aren't sure, then best to try to understand if you still need to make other adjustments beyond what is shown on the Cleveland Heart Inflammation panel. It is certainly a good sign that you are green on all of that inflammation panel. However, to my understanding a healthy lifestyle won't likely significantly reverse existing damage. If you can stabilize your health going forward, the existing damage might not be bother you as much as it would otherwise if it continued. If you are on a statin, over a period of time it can help reduce the plaque burden intima-media thickness by promoting the removal of cholesteryl ester from your arteries (see the videos on CIMT). Some people can do this to a degree without a statin by strict lifestyle adjustment, but not many it would appear. Through this same process you will also get some decrease in the size of discrete plaques. I try to keep my triglycerides under 100 mg/dL (well below the "normal" upper limit of 150 mg/dL standard) to decrease the addition of plaque in the future (see video on triglyceride/HDL-C ratio).
    Last edited by Tom; 02-08-2019, 11:01 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      hello doctor. this is my first post. thank you for sharing your knowledge.. i have a simple question of what do i do to raise mt HDL. i AM DOWN to a 39. i am 65 and have found how dramatic an effect going veggie can have. after 6 mnths monsterousbeneficial change but still low HDL.

      THANKS IN ADVANCE

      Comment


      • mtbizzle
        mtbizzle commented
        Editing a comment
        I think there's a relatively short list of stuff that is known to raise HDL.
        -Exercise!!
        -Niacin
        -Red wine, in small amounts? (I should say, you don't want sugary, sweet red wine, or a lot of alcohol. If you go for red wine, in part seeking a health benefit, get very 'dry' (low sugar, high tannin) red wine. Two ideal wines for this: Tannat & Sargantino wine. They are typically very 'dry', and they are known to have substantially higher tannins/resveratol than other wine.)
        -I believe a few foods may potentially help with HDL -- avocados, chia, flax, sardines, salmon, extra virgin olive oil?

    • #4
      I am not a doctor or even an expert, but I have tried to educate myself on the basics. Many, but not all, people who have low HDL-C also have triglycerides over 130 mg/dL (I used to have triglycerides over 300 mg/dL). Exercise, lowering carbohydrates in the diet and niacin can be helpful to lower triglycerides. For that group of people who tend towards metabolic syndrome, lowering their triglycerides will increase their HDL-C levels (see the videos on the triglyceride/HDL-C ratio). While there are issues with using the HDL-C level as an measure of HDL functionality, keeping the triglyceride/HDL-C ratio low (under 2 if possible) is beneficial health wise.

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by fatguy5 View Post
        hello doctor. this is my first post. thank you for sharing your knowledge.. i have a simple question of what do i do to raise mt HDL. i AM DOWN to a 39. i am 65 and have found how dramatic an effect going veggie can have. after 6 mnths monsterousbeneficial change but still low HDL.

        THANKS IN ADVANCE
        I am eating a vegetarian diet and I was amazed how quickly niacin lowered my ldl and raised my hdl. Both were in range, but not optimal and in just 3 months I saw a major improvement. Because of plaque problems (arteries and aortic valve), I am trying to drive my ldl down to 50-60, so I am adding low dose Crestor as well. I take Endur-acin which is extended release niacin and I experience only a very minor flush. My HDL went from about 46 to 69 in 3 months.
        Last edited by rich; 02-10-2019, 11:52 AM.

        Comment


        • mtbizzle
          mtbizzle commented
          Editing a comment
          Wow it's great to hear a case where the numbers are going in the right direction, big time! You probably already know this, but figured i'd mention -- I believe it's important to monitor your liver when taking niacin, especially extended release, higher dose? There are a few simple tests that are recommended, I believe. You should be able order the tests yourself, so you don't need to go to the doc just to monitor them.

      • #6
        Originally posted by Tom View Post
        So, the real question may be have you found out and corrected, to the extent possible, whatever health issues resulted in the aortic stenosis and arterial blockage? If you did then great, just keep a healthy lifestyle going forward. If you aren't sure, then best to try to understand if you still need to make other adjustments beyond what is shown on the Cleveland Heart Inflammation panel. It is certainly a good sign that you are green on all of that inflammation panel. However, to my understanding a healthy lifestyle won't likely significantly reverse existing damage. If you can stabilize your health going forward, the existing damage might not be bother you as much as it would otherwise if it continued. If you are on a statin, over a period of time it can help reduce the plaque burden intima-media thickness by promoting the removal of cholesteryl ester from your arteries (see the videos on CIMT). Some people can do this to a degree without a statin by strict lifestyle adjustment, but not many it would appear. Through this same process you will also get some decrease in the size of discrete plaques. I try to keep my triglycerides under 100 mg/dL (well below the "normal" upper limit of 150 mg/dL standard) to decrease the addition of plaque in the future (see video on triglyceride/HDL-C ratio).
        The only marker I know of that is still bad is homocysteine. I have a lab scheduled for next week, so I will see if that is still a problem. Someone on another board, whose opinion I respect, suggested iodine might help with homocysteine, so I am going to start adding kelp to stews, soups, etc and see if that helps.

        I am also starting low dose Crestor to try to drive ldl and total cholesterol down even further. I am following Dr Esselstyn's vegetarian diet which has been proven to stabilize and even reverse arterial plaque. He recommends ldl <= 50 and total cholesterol <=150. I don't think I can get that low without Crestor. My triglycerides were 91 at last lab.

        I also agree it is possible that changes I have made to my diet over the last couple of years may have stopped the plaque buildup and I may be dealing with old plaque. I am trying to find a reputable center that offers the CIMT ultrasound. My pcp said she would send out some emails and see what she can find out for me.

        One other improvement I just had is I fixed my leaky gut. It took a year working with my pcp, but she just showed me the results of latest lab test and my leaky gut and other gut problems are resolved.

        Comment


        • #7
          Originally posted by rich View Post

          I am eating a vegetarian diet and I was amazed how quickly niacin lowered my ldl and raised my hdl. Both were in range, but not optimal and in just 3 months I saw a major improvement. Because of plaque problems (arteries and aortic valve), I am trying to drive my ldl down to 50-60, so I am adding low dose Crestor as well. I take Endur-acin which is extended release niacin and I experience only a very minor flush. My HDL went from about 46 to 69 in 3 months.
          It is quite a puzzle that your heart labs all came back green. If you were assaulting your arteries with your lifestyle choices, one would thin that it would show up on those labs. This seems like pretty good news to me.

          From what I have gathered, Bale Doneen uses the CIMT to track whether you are maintaining your "arterial age". Finding someone to do this test for you seems like it should be your highest priority. This will allow you to set a baseline measure that you can track your progress against.

          BTW, are you making sure your post meal glucose stays nice and low, say 120 or less? You'd also want to ensure your blood pressure stays at 115/75 or less.

          Comment


          • #8
            Good points. Michelle at [email protected] can give you a contact for the CIMT.

            Comment


            • #9
              Originally posted by rich View Post
              Just got my results and not what I expected. I have severe aortic stenosis and arterial blockage, so I expected I had a severe
              Was this a coronary artery calcium test that diagnosed this? If so, you may not have soft plaques that would make your arterial inflammatory markers out of range. If these are calcified plaques I wonder if it’s necessary to take Crestor in order to help calcify something that’s already calcified.

              Comment


              • #10
                Originally posted by Tesla View Post

                Was this a coronary artery calcium test that diagnosed this? If so, you may not have soft plaques that would make your arterial inflammatory markers out of range. If these are calcified plaques I wonder if it’s necessary to take Crestor in order to help calcify something that’s already calcified.
                No, it was from a cardiac cath.

                Comment

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