Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Blood Sugar During the Day

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Blood Sugar During the Day

    In the past I've been diagnosed as insulin resistant. My A1c is 4.7. My FBG is usually between 90-100. During the day it usually hangs around 100-125. I don't recall it ever getting above 135 even after a meal. Should it be back into the 90's 4 hours after a meal? Is it hanging around 100-125 during the day something I should be concerned about? What is the biggest threat to doing damage to organs such as the kidneys: large spikes or hanging around in the 100-125 range like mine is? TIA

  • #2
    We all get some damage done to our bodies every day just by being alive. Once a person gets to a blood glucose level of 140 mg/dL, the damage gets more serious to small blood vessels. A person has small blood vessels everywhere in their body from the brain, to the kidneys, liver, eyes, etc. A lot of people first notice a problem with their eyes and blood pressure going up. I listed a couple of Dr. Campbell's videos on those problems in a separate topic recently (microvascular complications of diabetes). In fact, a person starts getting those problems long before they become a full diabetic. Many diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetics stay with a blood glucose level over 140 mg/dL for hours every day and live for a decade or two before the ultimate disease process becomes all too evident. The flip side of high blood glucose is high insulin levels which is one of the primary causes of cardiovascular inflammation and ultimately cardiovascular disease.

    Whether you are getting more damage done than is usual is hard to say with those blood glucose numbers. It might depend upon your age and how well your mitochondria are functioning. As we get older for many blood glucose levels will creep up no matter what we do, and at best we can try to minimize that process. Optimally you would have lower blood glucose numbers across the range, but not everybody is the same. Did you have an OGTT done? If so, did it indicate a problem? Do you eat carbs such that your triglyceride/HDL-C ratio is higher than 2? If you have had an advanced lipid panel, is your LDL-P level over 1200 nmol/L? You have to look around and see if there are multiple vectors pointing towards diet, exercise, etc. as places to potentially correct. One other thing to consider, is your blood glucometer fairly accurate? Eventually many people will be wearing CGM (continuous glucose monitoring) devices, but we are not there yet.
    Last edited by Tom; 07-06-2019, 12:59 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you have no problems with glycated/oxidized LDL or with inflammation then don't worry about it. On the other hand, if your lipoprotein subfractionation shows any Pattern B or your inflammation markers, such as with Lp-pla2 (should be well below 100), aren't excellent, then you might consider additional therapy. I have a similar problem with high BG (and too high Lp-pla2) and I intend to soon visit an endocrinologist and discuss taking metformin and ezetimibe/rosuvastatin. I have done about as much as I can with diet and lifestyle. And prayer and chicken soup are useless.

      Comment


      • #4
        Tom, you bring up a good point. I have questioned the accuracy of my machine. It's only a 6 month old Keto-Mojo. It has gotten rave reviews online and I believe even Dr. Brewer has given it a favorable review. Is there any way to test it's accuracy? I don't really have access to another machine to compare it with without buying another and I don't really want to do that.

        Comment


        • Tom
          Tom commented
          Editing a comment
          When you next get your blood glucose checked by a lab, take your Keto-Mojo along and test just after the blood draw.

      • #5
        Unfortunately the only thing definitely better than an OTC BG meter is lab grade equipment. And even if you test your meter against a lab test (assuming you do your finger prick at the same time as a blood draw in a medical setting), you don't know if that one reading's accuracy (or lack thereof) is consistent. One way to check for consistency is to do several tests back to back. That doesn't eliminate absolute error though. Another way is to get a second meter ($10 or $20) and compare. I did that and found the Accu-Chek consistently read lower than the Contour Next series. Contour Next and Contour Next One results were very highly correlated. It's easy to go down a rabbit hole trying to find the best OTC meter. For me, I'm just looking for long term trends, so I don't get too concerned about a slightly abnormal reading here or there. Primarily, I just want some visibility into my BG, as I'm on a statin.

        Comment


        • Tom
          Tom commented
          Editing a comment
          As there is no absolute way to check accuracy without a lot of equipment, checking the glucometer during a standard lab blood draw is about the best for most of us. Even then glucometers might easily have a 10% variance for a particular time and test strip. I agree that looking for trends is the major area to focus on, and that is what I do.
      Working...
      X