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  • Metformin

    https://lifespanbook.com/metformin-pill/

    https://twitter.com/davidasinclair

  • #2
    Good catch fatmax.

    ide note: I was so very impressed with my general practitioner. I asked if he would be willing to write me a script for metformin. He asked why of course and I told him that I believe my heart disease is stemming from poor glucose control and I wanted to see if metformin could help. He said that he had been seeing research lately talking about metformin as a life extension drug and that it seemed to have quite a lot of benefits. He wrote me the script with no issues. I was quite happy to see that he obviously is keeping up on current research and that he supports what I am trying to do for my own health.

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    • #3
      How much of an effect does Metformin have on glucose control for non-diabetics? For those taking Metformin who are pre-diabetic or not even pre-diabetic, how much of a decrease have you noticed in your fasting glucose and in your after meal glucose after starting metformin?

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      • #4
        I am non diabetic. Sadly Metformin and I did not get along very well and I had to stop taking it. I couldn't tolerate the side FX long enough to determine if it was doing anything good for my glucose levels.

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        • Sapien
          Sapien commented
          Editing a comment
          It is interesting that as a non-diabetic that you had a doctor prescribe Metformin in the first place. (By non-diabetic do you mean neither pre-diabetic nor fully diabetic?)

      • #5
        Below is what I posted to one of Dr. Brewer's recent videos on metformin.

        Meformin is beneficial for a wider group of people beyond the typical pre-diabetes/diabetes usage as noted, but there is a nuance that we should understand in using it. Metformin works by suppressing, to a small degree, the cells' mitochondrial ATP (energy) production mechanism which ironically results in all of the benefits that are noted. If a person is exercising vigorously, unfortunately metformin will also suppress part of the exercise stress adaptation benefits. There are a couple of studies out. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6351883/ Here is a second study showing that point. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/acel.13039 David Sinclair recently stated that he doesn't take metformin now, and I think that it is for this reason. I have been taking metformin for a couple of years, and I try to exercise vigorously at times. I now take metformin for those periods when I am not exercising vigorously (just walking for exercise).

        As far as how much does metformin reduce glucose levels, I haven't seen data indicating that a person taking a metformin pill of x mg will experience a y decrease in blood glucose levels in z hours. It does decrease appetite over time, and so that makes it a little more difficult to get some hard numbers. I would say that metformin is a lifestyle boosting drug given all of the pleiotrophic effects. Unfortunately it does cause some people upset stomach/GI issues, and so best to start with a low dose and slowly increase.
        Last edited by Tom; 11-05-2019, 08:49 AM.

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        • Sapien
          Sapien commented
          Editing a comment
          What I have heard David Sinclair say in recent interviews is that he does take Metformin but mainly on days when he won't be exercising. My understanding is that he only took 500 mg per day on the days he does takes it.

          Peter Attia and David Sinclair discussed supplements they take in Peter Attia's podcast from 9/9/2019:

          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcas...400828889?mt=2 (about 1 hr 29 min)

      • #6
        I ran across this interesting article on Metformin:

        "Metformin acutely lowers blood glucose levels by inhibition of intestinal glucose transport" https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-42531-0

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        • #7
          Is it best to take Metformin in the regular release form or the extended release form, and can the extended release pill be cut in half if needed? I tried Metformin years ago but as I recall the side effects for me me were pretty bad. I want to start out with a low dose.

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          • #8
            Here is a website that answers most of your questions. https://www.goodrx.com/blog/metformi...min-pros-cons/
            Basically try metformin ER (aka Glucophage XR) if you might be more prone to stomach issues. The minimum recommended dose is 500 mg/day (taken with evening meal). If you get a Glucophage XR tablet, you should not cut it in half. https://www.pharmacistanswers.com/qu...min-er-in-half
            You can cut a metformin IR (immediate release) tablet in half, but I have only seen 500 mg versions of that tablet.

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            • #9
              I'm in my mid-40s, noticed that I was somewhat insulin resistant by taking my blood sugar reading after 1 hour my dinner. Noticed on some occasions, particularly when I ate my previously typical amount of carbs, I was easily going over 140.
              Started to experiment with metformin (liquid form) which belongs to a family member. Took 250mg. I noticed a drop of between 18- 25 mg/dl drop in BG within 30 min approx (my BG profile as I have discovered over these 2-3 weeks, my BG spikes around 1 hour mark and falls thereafter).
              Fasting BG tend to be around low 80s.
              Thank you Dr Ford for shining the light on IR for people like me!

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              • #10
                Thank you very much for sharing that!

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                • #11
                  Where does metformin act to provide the beneficial effects relative to insulin resistance and glucose control? Interestingly it is in the kidney and the gut rather than the liver and muscle. Dr. Brewer has mentioned that he thought that metformin's effects on the gut were important, and that is the case according to the 2019 Banting Medal lecture. Stephen O'Rahilly of Cambridge gave the 2019 Banting Medal lecture, and I found the part on metformin to be particularly interesting. The GDF15 related discussion starts at the 29:29 point with the metformin related part specifically starts at 33:28. The role of a protein GDF15 was examined as responsible for these changes in the kidney and gut. Ironically the same mitochondrial inhibition noted for muscle building with metformin usage is what also provides the positive effects on insulin resistance and glucose control in the kidney and gut. That is really ironic. As a secondary thought, the GDF15 also affects a specific area of the brain resulting in suppression of appetite that is widely noted in people taking metformin.
                  https://professional.diabetes.org/we...-human-extreme
                  Last edited by Tom; 02-01-2020, 05:08 AM.

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                  • laketahoebob
                    laketahoebob commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Thanks for the reference. Very interesting talk. It seemed to me that the metformin gut effects were more based on the suppression of appetite and the attendant reduction in glucose levels (and therefore insulin).

                • #12
                  FDA release indicates no need for recall of metformin in US as NDMA levels were low to non-detectable.
                  https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safet...ndma-metformin

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