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  • “New research” ??

    https://youtu.be/EdKxot74tQg
    What do you think of this? I find the opposite to be true.

  • #2
    Ah, yeah the never ending Internet battle on which diet is best. The problem with a one-size fits all diet scenario is that people are genetically different along with significant changes in metabolism as we age coupled with a person's overall health status. I heard something recently that I thought was good advice. We need macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients, and so any diet a person follows long-term should provide enough of both (but not too much). For a breakdown of the three macro-nutrients:
    1. Carbs - Eat enough to provide fuel for the body in general, but make sure that fasting glucose is kept low-enough (~85 mg/dL) to prevent long-term damage from both high glucose and resulting high insulin levels. The amount and type of carbs that we can eat as we age may be different and likely more restricted (fruit as an example because fructose consumption becomes a problem for many people).
    2. Protein - Eat just enough protein in order to achieve and maintain adequate muscle mass and prevent sarcopenia in old age. A person would also need to exercise to make this work well.
    3. Fats - The rest has got to be fat. Pick fats which work well with your genetics as shown on blood lipid panel markers. Some people can metabolize saturated fat better than others. Find out and adjust accordingly.
    A person could add a whole bunch more and make a book out of this, but starting with the basics helps.

    I think that a short-term keto diet, even periodic cycling in and out of ketosis, has long-term health benefits for the broader population. However, there is a genetic/biological reason why the bulk of people who lived in the Artic region cannot enter ketosis well. If ketosis was so great long-term, there wouldn't have been a very strong genetic selective sweep (CPT-1a variant) to reduce the ketone-making ability in this population who otherwise would have been the perfect candidates for permanent ketosis.

    My thought on a vegan approach is based upon how well items 1, 2 and 3 are fulfilled. I suppose that it is possible, but not easy. If it is not easy, how many people actually do it well? Again, it may work well for some people for periods of their lives.

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    • #3
      Robin: This is definitely a vegan propaganda film. Here is the cast of well known characters behind “Mastering Diabetes”.
      https://m.youtube.com/user/mindfuldiabeticrobby. You are wise to be critical of this type of misinformation.

      Click image for larger version  Name:	Screen Shot 2018-11-09 at 8.20.58 AM.png Views:	1 Size:	518.4 KB ID:	589

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      • #4
        Great feedback thanks you two.

        Comment


        • #5
          Talking about new research, here is a fresh new one that I think is worth examining:


          The short-chain fatty acid propionate increases glucagon and FABP4 production, impairing insulin action in mice and humans​​​​​​

          https://stm.sciencemag.org/content/11/489/eaav0120

          It is important to note that propionate is widely used by the industry as a food preservative.

          There seems to be yet another connection between a specific fatty acid and insulin resistance.

          Comment


          • #6
            Good morning to all,

            Here is a link that adds more petrol to the discussion carbs x fats
            Protein Kinase C Epsilon Deletion in Adipose Tissue, but Not in Liver, Improves Glucose Tolerance

            https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...783?via%3Dihub

            ​​​​​​Notice the picture with the four rats!

            It shows the role of the fat tissues signalling but what surprises me the most is the fact that the experiment induces insulin resistance in rats by feeding them a high fat diet. It also shows that it can be knocked out.

            Here is the link where I found the above reference Diabetes: Surprising new role of fat revealed

            https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.med...les/amp/323347

            My gut feeling tells me that we should be very cautious before embracing a high fat diet.

            Comments, anyone?

            Comment


            • #7
              Here is an interesting article by Eric Topol on diets while I wait for the keto fans to respond to oketz

              https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/02/o...-diabetes.html

              As another interesting item, one of Eric Topol's patients also listed out all 12 diets that she tried while eventually settling on the last one on the right.

              Last edited by Tom; 04-28-2019, 09:50 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by oketz View Post
                Good morning to all,

                Here is a link that adds more petrol to the discussion carbs x fats
                Protein Kinase C Epsilon Deletion in Adipose Tissue, but Not in Liver, Improves Glucose Tolerance

                https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...783?via%3Dihub

                ​​​​​​Notice the picture with the four rats!

                It shows the role of the fat tissues signalling but what surprises me the most is the fact that the experiment induces insulin resistance in rats by feeding them a high fat diet. It also shows that it can be knocked out.

                Here is the link where I found the above reference Diabetes: Surprising new role of fat revealed

                https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.med...les/amp/323347

                My gut feeling tells me that we should be very cautious before embracing a high fat diet.

                Comments, anyone?
                Can you summarize this or explain it ?? Thanks

                Comment


                • oketz
                  oketz commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hi, Robin. I will try. I am no expert on the subject.

                  First thing I noticed was this Gene responsible for the enzyme PKCɛ that if knocked out turns rats immune to IR induced by a HIGH FAT DIET.
                  The focus of the article is to find out the liver and the adipose tissue roles in this signalling. And the conclusion is that the liver is not the culprit - look at the 4 rats picture.
                  Despite the goal of the article what caught my attention was the fact that HIGH FAT diet was chosen to induce glucose intolerance.
                  Could we humans be on the same boat with the rats?
                  I would love to hear Dr. Brewer's opinion on this.

              • #9
                Originally posted by Tom View Post
                Here is an interesting article by Eric Topol on diets while I wait for the keto fans to respond to oketz

                https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/02/o...-diabetes.html

                As another interesting item, one of Eric Topol's patients also listed out all 12 diets that she tried while eventually settling on the last one on the right.

                So confused now.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Thanks for the link, Tom.

                  It reminded me of Eran Segal:

                  https://youtu.be/0z03xkwFbw4

                  https://youtu.be/QsphKXIabvk

                  Yes, some people are immune to ice cream and cakes!

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    But does it distinguish between what type of fats?

                    Comment


                    • oketz
                      oketz commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I could not figure it out but I have seen several other studies that show a clear distinction between sat/unsaturated fatty acids regarding insulin resistance. Monounsaturated fats seem to improve insulin response. On the other hand palmitic acid seems to cause insulin resistance.

                  • #12
                    Yes I would agree.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      I have become convinced that the two sugars that travel together are not equal weight in terms of damages. But we get them together, so I avoid them. But the glucose derived from starch is less dangerous. Take a look at this review paper and consider the metabolic pathways. And the high toll that fructose brings to the liver because of the formation of methylglyoxal and subsequent Maillard reaction, ten fold over glucose and that is invisible to the A1c test. Look for the excellent graphics on the side of the first page.
                      https://www.bioscience.org/2019/v24/...p?bframe=2.htm
                      Robert Lustig mentioned this work in a podcast that I heard today.
                      "A calorie is not a calorie."

                      Comment


                      • sthubbar
                        sthubbar commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Robin, agreed about glucose and fructose. I have also been convinced that glucose is relatively benign and fructose is poison.

                    • #14
                      I agree that fructose is probably worse than glucose for most people, but high levels of glucose in the blood from any source is going to cause insulin resistance and many of the common health problems over time. If the level of glucose in the blood is kept low enough, the inevitable effects of just living don't accelerate diseases of aging. I expect that the CGM (continuous glucose monitoring) systems will evolve to be cheaper over time and ultimately worn by many besides type 1 diabetics/type 2 insulin injecting diabetics (who are the primary focus for now). I think that the use of CGM could be very effective in lifestyle modification.

                      Comment


                      • Robin
                        Robin commented
                        Editing a comment
                        But we never become insulin sensitive again if we are even a tad IR and change our diet drastically to exclude carbs (glucose and fructose).... because yes we can keep the glucose from spiking...but after two years of being OCD about diet and exercise - when eating one slice of thin crust pizza as a test, my BG went to 140 and stayed there for 2 hours. SUCKS! Don't enjoy life nearly as much as I used to with this lifestyle change.

                    • #15
                      There was a study in England where the results came that fruits lower the risk of diabetes -

                      It said apples and bananas reduces diabetes risk by 13-14%. Will paste that link if I can find it,
                      Certain fruits such as blueberries are far more effective at preventing diabetes than others (cantaloupe and strawberries). Bananas and grapes, and Blueberries reduces risk!




                      Screenshot 2019-05-03 at 9.51.54 PM.png

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