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NAD+ blood test?

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  • NAD+ blood test?

    Who here has taken an NAD+ blood test? Are you using another test to judge NAD+ supplementation benefits? Epigenetic clock?

    Because of the expense of NR and NMN, it would be great to see how they actually impact NAD+ levels. In addition, I have seen some people using nicotinamide as a more affordable NAD+ booster and it would be interesting to see if the niacin (nicotinic acid) that several of us here take for lipid control also boosts NAD+.

  • #2
    I wouldn't recommend people get an NAD+ blood test as it isn't clear that extra-cellular NAD+ is a positive indication of health or lack thereof. I know that some of the proponents for NR/NMN cite the rise in blood NAD+ levels as indicative that it is working. I went through a long explanation on all of this a while back, and I could go find and re-post that if that would be useful. The one thing that NR and NMN do is provide a path to increase NAD+, primarily in the liver, before the NAD salvage path is followed with nicotinamide production/methlyation and urination. There is no indication that NAD+ rises in most of the other body tissues to a substantial amount. A small amount of NR (and I would think NMN) does get into muscle tissue, but it isn't clear that there is enough to make a difference. Great for the liver though. That NAD+ being measured in the blood after taking NR/NMN is NAD+ leaking out of the liver cells. Unfortunately there are no known cell transporters to get that circulating NAD+ into other cells. People getting NAD+ transfusions note a strong reaction which Chris Masterjohn thought was likely inflammatory (i.e. NAD+ in the blood means that there are likely cells dying and the need for an inflammatory clean-up cycle).

    When you see videos of old mice running like crazy on relatively high dose NMN, just remember that rodents have a metabolism that is around six times higher than humans. To my knowledge there hasn't been a successful study showing a significant improvement in human health markers from either NR or NMN (I wish it were true though)....Chris Masterjohn postulated that low dose NR/NMN would likely have limited long-term benefits for older people but not likely for younger healthy people.
    Last edited by Tom; 01-23-2020, 01:08 AM.

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    • Tom
      Tom commented
      Editing a comment
      Just in case anybody wonders, I have great respect for David Sinclair and his work. He and his lab are doing some fantastic work, and I think that there will be some interesting developments announced over the next few years. I have heard that the Horvath clock is being used for some life insurance policies, and so there is obviously something to it. There is on-going work on refining which markers to use for a biologic clock, and I wouldn't plunk down money just yet to a commercial company advertising that they have the definitive answer. I bit on getting a telomere length test done a few years ago, and there are indications that the test isn't as certain as perhaps some people thought. I heard that Elizabeth Blackburn has backed away from the way the telomere testing has been implemented, and so it makes me reluctant to rush into another supposed accurate test. I have been taking NR in the past, and I will likely do so in the future. NMN is more difficult to manufacture, and I would buy it if I felt confident that the maker was certified in some way.

    • sthubbar
      sthubbar commented
      Editing a comment
      Tom, so the only age test that I think is reliable is the CardioRisk CIMT. Please tell me you think that is reasonably accurate. Are there any others that give you a similar confidence?

    • Tom
      Tom commented
      Editing a comment
      The CIMT arterial age estimate is based to my understanding solely on the overall plaque burden levels in a person's carotid arteries. The CIMT arterial age estimate is helpful in understanding whether a person is developing cardiovascular disease. The operator technique and software being used to calculate the plaque burden can vary enough for it to be considered as less accurate at times. That is why Dr. Brewer uses CardioRisk. A CIMT arterial age estimate is substantially different from a body clock estimate through either telomeres or epigenetic marks.
      Last edited by Tom; 01-23-2020, 02:26 AM.

  • #3
    Rhonda Patrick just posted a comprehensive video on NAD+ for those who might be interested. https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/nad-nr-nmn

    Comment


    • laketahoebob
      laketahoebob commented
      Editing a comment
      Wow! A lot of rapid-fire information. That gal can spit the words out quickly. I think I'll await more studies before considering NR or NMN.
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