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Niacin - how much is enough?

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  • Niacin - how much is enough?

    I started trying to take 500mg of plain niacin per day with a large meal. I thought the flushing would subside, but it has not over several months. So I reduced to 100mg, and even that can sometimes cause a flush. I fear taking any other form, including "extended release niacin" simply because of vague risks mentioned on various non-reliable sources. LOL

    The flush especially on the higher dose can be quite uncomfortable in most parts of the body, and occur an hour or more later.

    Why would some be more sensitive to flushing and not become acclimatized to it?

    Perhaps, I don't need as much? Not really sure what the mechanisms of the various potential healthful benefits that people seek. I guess I could read up on lipids.... but that is such a complex and political/religous topic.

    My non-rigourous reasoning and the potential benefit that I'm seeking is that it increases blood flow into areas that may be "low" on blood supply, and help move in nutrients and flush out waste products. Any comments on this idea?

    Thanks for your consideration.

    ++Regards
    Grant
    Last edited by grantrostig; 02-25-2019, 11:34 PM. Reason: added tags

  • #2
    The reasons that most people are interested in niacin seem to mainly be related to (1) Lp(a) and (2) HDL-C levels and relationship to triglyceride levels. I have not seen anything on niacin increasing blood flow, helping move nutrients and flush out of waste products.

    There have been a lot of posts written about niacin, especially by John Lorscheider on what to buy, how much to take and the flushing effect. Rather than recreate those posts you can easily perform an advanced search on the term niacin. Click on the down arrow of the search box at the very top of this webpage, select advanced search from the menu, enter niacin in the keyword search criteria and start the search. I noted 55 results on niacin.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Tom View Post
      The reasons that most people are interested in niacin seem to mainly be related to (1) Lp(a) and (2) HDL-C levels and relationship to triglyceride levels. I have not seen anything on niacin increasing blood flow, helping move nutrients and flush out of waste products.

      There have been a lot of posts written about niacin, especially by John Lorscheider on what to buy, how much to take and the flushing effect. Rather than recreate those posts you can easily perform an advanced search on the term niacin. Click on the down arrow of the search box at the very top of this webpage, select advanced search from the menu, enter niacin in the keyword search criteria and start the search. I noted 55 results on niacin.
      Hi Tom, Thanks for your answer are you a "moderator" of the group? Note, I'm a long time user of search (alta-vista) (and programmer) and didn't find a relevant entry for my actual questions (three of them with ? mark). They may be there, but I couldn't find them based on the title of the posts. Ie. how much is enough for each type of desired effect., acclimatization, and my "new theory".

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      • #4
        No, I am not a moderator. Just to be clear, any members who want to comment can easily do so. I did answer that I have not seen anything on the forum on your "new theory" related to niacin. I have no idea on how that theory is supposed to work. If you want people to comment on that theory, perhaps you could include a formal study or something that would provide some details. I did answer on how you can easily access information that has already been sent several times for those wanting to use niacin for whatever purpose related to type, amount and flushing.

        Below is an example:
        https://759241a66b89-003789.vbulleti...release-vs-not

        Here is an excerpt from one of John Lorscheider's comments on niacin:


        The benefits of niacin in the form of nicotinic acid are many:

        1. Raises HDL cholesterol

        2. Lower LDL cholesterol

        3. Lowers Lp(a)

        4. Reduces total cholesterol

        5. Reduces triglycerides

        6. Reduces VLDL cholesterol

        7. Reduces arterial inflammation


        Many doctors don't believe in the value of niacin. The science is there but they don't choose to believe it.


        Yes, Niacin can be very effective. It can be purchased without a prescription. I've been taking it for 10 years. Dosages of 1,000 to 2,000 MG, once per day, of extended release formulas like Endur-Acin, Rugby, Slo-Niacin can work well.


        As far as niacin goes, be sure the base ingredient is nicotinic acid which is the only form of niacin that has a beneficial effect on lipids and Lp(a). Niacinamide and Inositol Hexanicotinate don't work for lipids. Start niacin at low doses and work up as it takes time to get used to it.


        There are three types:


        Instant-Release - Lowest possible concern for elevated liver enzymes. Highest level of flushing. Usually taken 2-3 times daily.


        Extended-Release (releases over 8-12 hours) - Low to moderate concern for elevated liver enzymes. Less flushing. Doses of 2,000 MG or less, once daily, are usually not a problem. Endur-Acin, Slo-Niacin, Niaspan are typical examples of ER Niacin.


        Sustained-Release (releases over 12+ hours) - Highest level of concern for elevated liver enzymes. Least flushing.


        That is a lot of bang for $8 to $16 per month.


        https://www.amazon.com/ENDUR-ACIN-Ni...pSrc=srch&th=1


        Start with 500 MG with dinner once per day. Add 500 MG more in 4 weeks until you get to 1,000 MG. Then after 4 weeks at 1,000 MG get your labs. The flush is mild and diminishes the longer you use it. Some people report drinking a large glass of ice water or taking an aspirin 1-hour before taking niacin helps to reduce the flush.


        You can add more from that point as dictated by your labs.
        Last edited by Tom; 02-27-2019, 07:14 AM.

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        • #5
          The flush I get from enduracin is mild and not unpleasant at all. Sometimes I flush and sometimes I don't. It lowered my ldl and raised hdl very quickly.

          If you haven't had an advanced lipid panel done, I would recommend it. That should indicate to you how much niacin to take.

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          • #6
            I've been a believer in niacin...have taken 2000mg a day for 14months. 8 months used slow release 6 months used immediate release...but 2 out of 5 blood tests over 14months shows very high liver enzymes. So despite my high LPa and LDL of 111... I stopped taking it . Now I don't know what to do.

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            • #7
              Glad it's working for you. It ruins my liver.

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              • #8
                Anyone have concerns about Niacin and liver damage? I've read a number of articles that recommend no more than 35mg a day to avoid damaging the liver. Here's one from WebMD. https://www.webmd.com/diet/supplement-guide-niacin#1

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rayray View Post
                  Anyone have concerns about Niacin and liver damage? I've read a number of articles that recommend no more than 35mg a day to avoid damaging the liver. Here's one from WebMD. https://www.webmd.com/diet/supplement-guide-niacin#1
                  WOW, crazy! I know I couldn't tolerate it and because on heartburn and not the flush.
                  One Dr. warned me of possible blood sugar consequences over time as well from.
                  Niacin is not without risks! I'd say watch blood sugar and liver enzymes and especially if on statin too.

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                  • #10
                    Yes. Both are concerns.

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